Modifying and applying tools to context

We recently hosted a day-long workshop with Microsoft, where we explored the potentials of the tools in the DIY Toolkit (Development Impact & You) for their team. In this immersive hands-on workshop we looked at how these tools can be used among multidisciplinary design teams, to both communicate design research findings to stakeholders as well as identify design actions for the future. Using design documentaries and heuristic data as our starting point, we looked at how these tools can provide a beneficial structure to the ongoing, open-ended collaborations amongst designers.

The tools in the DIY Toolkit are versatile and can be applied and modified depending on the task at hand. For example, we used the Experience Tour to immerse ourselves in the particular perspective of a user of fitness-tracking technology. We looked at how the Causes Diagram can break down a complex ‘core problem’ into underlying causes and symptoms, which can help to prioritise your team’s particular set of tasks. Using the Fast Idea Generator and Promises and Potential Map, we were able to generate ideas from our research findings and analysis and then look at these ideas in the context of how they may be ‘evolutionary’, ‘incremental’, or ‘disruptive’ to new and existing users.

diy-workshop-flyer_v2

We finished the day by using the Prototype Testing Plan, a tool that can be used to help quickly test and iterate an idea, improving upon it with each iteration. For the team it was helpful to see that these tools can be applied at various stages of a project, and at various scales of thinking about an issue – from identifying first opportunities, to addressing a complex problem, or in relation to a particular product launch. Throughout the workshop, we discussed and saw first-hand the versatility and adaptability of the DIY Toolkit; the tools can be used in more than one way, in a different order, or even combined to generate new ideas and ways of thinking around a design issue.

Innovation for Culture in Mexico

Joined by various other partners and coordinators, including the British Council Mexico, Aura, Birds of Paradise and advisors from the Policy Lab UK and Design …

Co-creating neighbourhood participation

How to step up from the occasional neighborhood consultation to more ongoing neighborhood participation as part of a public space design project? This was the challenge…

Towards better digital inclusion

Approximately 2,5 million people in the Netherlands still experience difficulties while using digital devices such as computers, smartphones or tablets (Stichting…

Learning by doing

The best way to learn a new skill or a new way of working is to actually do it. This does not mean however that you have to start from scratch and figure everything out by…

Exploring Remote Teamwork

Over the past decade, as more digital tools have become available for remote collaboration, and more organisations have embraced flexible working, teamworkers…

Global online learning

The Reach Network of professionals in design and innovation has brought its seasoned practitioners from around the world together to create 5 masterclasses on

Exploring listening experiences

Stations, the new app introduced by Spotify in the US, offers a radio-like listening experience for users who don’t tend to curate their own playlists and listen …

Speculative design with MSF

In collaboration with our Indian REACH partner Quicksand, we helped Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) to rethink their role as a global organisation within the future…

Collaborative R&D Labs

What Design Can Do and STBY have recently tried out a new format for bringing professionals together to develop their thinking and practices around complex societal…